9 must visit art galleries and museums in the UK

tate

Here is our selections of museums we think you should visit at least once in your life.

 

  1. Tate Britain
    1. We should have really put them as four seperate museums, as they are all awesome on their own. But depending where you are in the country, make your way either to the Tate Britain and Modern in London, Tate Liverpool or Tate St. Ives. All four of them have an amazing selection of original paintings and artwork you could use ArtGuru with. Have a look at the BP special exhibition at the Tate Britain for example. They also have free Wifi. So there are no excuses anymore.
  2. National Gallery
    1. If you like it a bit more traditional and you rather see a Renoir than a Matisse, cross the waters towards Trafalgar Square and escape the late winter cold at the National Gallery. You don’t have to go far to find a classic. From van Eyck to van Gogh, there is literally something for everyone (and for the ones of you that can’t handle art at all, make sure you visit their café).
  3. National Portrait Gallery
    1. You could leave your coat in the cloak room at the National Gallery and hop over to the National Portrait Gallery. Find landscapes boring and rather study the wrinkles of past and present royalty? Then you are right there. You can feel close to everyone who somehow got famous during the last, well, properly 500 years if not longer. Maybe you can also detect what is a photograph and what is a painting.
  4. Manchester Art Gallery
    1. Got enough of London, but can’t quiet let the city smoke behind? Why not have a day/weekend trip to Manchester. You live there? Well, then ignore me. You probably know the Manchester art scene much better than I do. So if you have any suggestions, do let me know and we will update the list. For everyone else, head to the Manchester Art Gallery. From Impressionism to Chinese Art and Craft, they got it covered.
  5. Scottish National Gallery
    1. Haggis rather than Yorkshire Pudding? Robert Burns more a name than Dylan Thomas? Then we have crossed the border to Scotland. From Scottish Art to French Impressionism, everything to your delight. In the same city there are also the Scottish National Portrait Gallery and the Scottish Gallery of Contemporary Art. So make sure you plan at least a day for your art hunt. And don’t forget to take ArtGuru with you. We are always excited to see what you’ve discovered.
  6. Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum
    1. Enough of the East Coast? Then book your ticket and head over to Glasgow and visit one of the most beautiful museums I have seen so far: Kelvingrove. Have a look at the works of MacIntosh or take a leisurely stroll to the Dutch Gallery. Definitely plan in a day to see it all!
  7. Plymouth City Museum and Gallery
    1. We are travelling South. Like, so much south that it would probably take a whole day if you follow this list step by step. We advise: Don’t do it. Travel sensible. But if you are there anyway, visit the Plymouth City Museum and Gallery. From Ancient Egypt to China, travel the word while being in the same building.
  8. The Royal Pavillon Brighton
    1. In the suburbs of London….No, wait. We are wrong. Brighton alone is beautiful enough to make it a daytrip, even for all the grumpy Londoners. And don’t just spend all your money on the pier, but get some quietness in the Royal Pavillon. Always worth a visit, but check before you travel what is on, as it is changing regularly.
  9. Leeds Art Gallery
    1. I have realised that I am sending you up and down the country. But we are already at nine and after that you can plan your own travels. Last stop: Leeds. Don’t walk past this beautiful building, but enter and you will find a great selection. Have a look at the Age of Glamour or Herakles. The choice is yours.

 

Now, this list is not here for no reasons. This should give you some inspiration for our competition. ArtGuru will give away the National Art Pass to one lucky user. See what you have to do on our website to be in the chance for winning.

One day with the VIP’s of London

A very exciting week lies behind us. We were out taking selfies with the Windsor’s at the National Portrait Gallery, we were continuing our cat trail and were amazed by the Surrealists at the Tate Modern.

With all these impressions we thought we will start poetic into the new week. Can you guess with which famous person we started our hunt for famous Londoners?

Tyger Tyger, burning bright,

In the forests of the night;

What immortal hand or eye,

Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

No, we did not turn our focus on bigger felines. Are the bells ringing? Yes, we have been visiting William Blake, known not just for one of his most famous poem “The Tyger”. And where else would we find him than at the National Portrait Gallery, London?

William Blake by Thomas Phillips oil on canvas, 1807 On display in Room 18 at the National Portrait Gallery NPG 212

William Blake by Thomas Phillips
oil on canvas, 1807
On display in Room 18 at the National Portrait Gallery

He is sharing Room Number 18 with another rather famous literary person. (Who he looks rather scared at) Can you guess by the quote below?

“The world to me was a secret, which I desired to discover; to her it was a vacancy, which she sought to people with imaginations of her own.”

Not quiet? Maybe something more obvious?

“Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful.”

Of course we are talking about Mary Shelley and her novel Frankenstein.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley by Richard Rothwell oil on canvas, exhibited 1840

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
by Richard Rothwell
oil on canvas, exhibited 1840

And because the best things come in threes: Who am I to forget THE most famous writer of the UK? I’ll make it easy this time to avoid any reminiscing of past school days.

“To be, or not to be, that is the question.”

Yes, Shakespeare is part of our personal ArtGuru collection. Maybe he is asking that questions about himself too.By the way, the snazzy golden earring he is wearing is a status symbol (different to what we might think today). It was also used to blog the entry holes of the body from the evil spirits.

 

associated with John Taylor oil on canvas, feigned oval, circa 1600-1610

associated with John Taylor
oil on canvas, feigned oval, circa 1600-1610

After all this literature we felt like something more down to earth. So we went for someone who took us the fear of being in a plane during a thunderstorm. (I can only speak for myself here). Michael Faraday. Born in the now London Borough of Southwark, Faraday went on to become one of the most regarded scientists in his field.

Michael Faraday by Thomas Phillips oil on canvas, 1841-1842

Michael Faraday
by Thomas Phillips
oil on canvas, 1841-1842

Faraday’s portrait is hanging right next to another scientist. The Scottish chemist Thomas Graham, who died in London in 1869. He was the founder of the Chemical Society in London and the one who discovered dialysis.

Thomas Graham by Wilhelm Trautschold oil on canvas, 1850-1875

Thomas Graham by Wilhelm Trautschold
oil on canvas, 1850-1875

 

 

Our last stop before heading out into the London fog are the leaders of the country. On the 24th of January it was his 50th anniversary of his death. To follow the route of this blog I have seem to have taken, here is a quote:

“I may be drunk, Miss, but in the morning I will be sober and you will still be ugly.”

It is not this guy from last weekend who thought he was very funny. It is: Winston Churchill.

Winston Churchill by Walter Richard Sickert oil on canvas, 1927

Winston Churchill by Walter Richard Sickert
oil on canvas, 1927

And to round it all up our selection of the weird and wonderful of the London population, who could I not miss out after my selfie last week?

You are right: The Royal Family. We selected two paintings by the artists Bryan Organ and one all time classic by Oswald Birley.

Prince Charles by Bryan Organ acrylic on canvas, 1980

Prince Charles by Bryan Organ
acrylic on canvas, 1980

Diana, Princess of Wales by Bryan Organ acrylic on canvas, 1981

Diana, Princess of Wales by Bryan Organ
acrylic on canvas, 1981

King George V by Sir Oswald Birley oil on canvas, circa 1933

King George V by Sir Oswald Birley
oil on canvas, circa 1933

 

But there are certainly more out there. We could not add anymore. After all this collecting our gallery looks like that:

IMG_0221

 

And there will be many more. Maybe you can guess who we will be featuring next week.

Let us know who you found and share it with us either via our Twitter account (@artguruapp) or follow us on Facebook.

If you have any recommendations of what you would like to see next, write us.