How technology is shaping the artworld.

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Last week I have been discussing the impact of the tech industry on the arts in terms of its curatorial implications. That left me wondering how the tech industry is affecting the artist itself. If you follow us on Twitter (if you don’t than you should now), than you may have seen the article we have shared by Shutterstock. I went on to research digital art and got intrigued how artists include technology into their art making process.

As mentioned in other post before, our lives are revolving around what we can and can’t do with the help of technology. So it was only a matter of time before artists picked up on new technologies in their creating process.

Last year Conrad Bodman curated Digital Revolution at the Barbican in London. Alongside devices I remembered from my childhood, like the original Game Boy and the first Sims, the exhibition showcased new pieces by artists who are actively engaged with digital technologies. One example are The Treachery of Sanctuary by Chris Milk. Rather than putting the visitor in the role of the observer, he becomes part of the art. Here, digital technology creates a stage, turning everyone and everything into art. There is also the aspect of originality. No two artworks will ever be the same. As soon as you step from the stage, the art is gone with you.

There are other approaches in cooperating digital data into art. The artists duo Jon Thomson and Alison Craighead are using news and RSS feeds, reshape them and by doing so creating art pieces representing our modern world. In an interview with Deezen, Thomson says something that, I feel, is the most important aspect of working with digital technologies: “ […] we’re just artists that work within the contemporary art context [with] all of the kinds of concerns that we share with artists that might be working sculpturally or might be working with paint, or any kind of material.”

And we might not be aware of this, but we all do create art on a daily basis. Instagram and Snapchat for example are turning us into artists, sharing our work globally (or only for 10 seconds for that matter). A good example is this guy. You can follow him on Twitter too.

Norwegian graphic designer Geir Ove Pedersen and his Snapchat Art

 

 

And he is only one example of the artists we have to watch out for. With the introduction of social media digital artists, or artists in general, can work more independently. We don’t have to rely anymore on curators and the big names in the artworld to tell us what is good and what is bad art. If we don’t like it, we won’t share it.

And this is not only a huge advantage for us, but also for communities who are not fortunate enough to receive any kind of funding or other financial recognition. The Atlanta Blackstar has recently published an article highlighting the importance of digital technology for African Artists. With the introduction of broadband and fiber-optic in many African towns, it is now possible for artists to get their work out there. That does not only make them accessible for their local audience, but can spread their work globally. The art-market, once hugely concentrated on leading art galleries and experts, is now open to a new kind of audience and curating style.

But despite the advantages it is providing us with, there is already the feeling out there that technology will estranges us from ourselves.  If we are stuck, we are looking for an app to help us and our smartphone is entertaining us during the hours of our morning commute. But as Papermag put it: digital technology can be both, a gods end and a soul sucker. The Eyebeam’s 2015 art and technology showcase tried to put the humanized side of technology in the foreground. And if you want to reclaim your privacy, Allison Burtch has just got the right thing for you: a small box that cuts out cellphone frequency, turning every conversation quiet.

But where else can digital lead us? I have shortly mentioned in the last blog post the artist Olafur Eliasson. He has taken what technology is offering us to generate a social impact with his invention called Little Sun. Little Sun is a solar lamp in the shape of a sunflower, creating light where there is no access to other forms of electricity. Its success does heavily rely on donations and is therefore an artwork sponsored by the public.

And there is certainly more out there. Digital becomes a new material for the artists while creating new ways of how the audience can engage with art. And it is only a matter of time until the major galleries and museums will acknowledge this art form and actively support it.